Lhotse (Saxophone Duo)

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Lhotse[Page].jpg
Steve Danyew_Lhotse.png
Lhotse[Page].jpg

Lhotse (Saxophone Duo)

from 25.50

In his book “Into Thin Air,” Jon Krakauer describes moments perched on the Lhotse face; “I sat with my feet hanging over the abyss, staring across the clouds, looking down on the tops of 22,000- foot peaks that a month earlier had towered overhead. At long last, it seemed as though I was really nearing the roof of the world.”

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Pricing

Printed Score & Printed Parts: $34.00
Printed Score & Digital PDF Parts: $25.50
 

Details

Alto and Tenor Saxophone Duo
Year of Composition: 2005
Length: 12:00 

Program Note

On a summit attempt of Mount Everest in the magnificent Himalaya range, the Lhotse face culminates at 26,000 feet, the last stop before the summit push.  It is from here that tired and battered climbers look up to the seemingly near peak of Everest, a.k.a Chomolangma, or “Mother Goddess of the World” as it is respectfully referred to in her homeland of Nepal. 

The “third pole” as it is often termed lies only 2,000 vertical feet above the Lhotse face, a mere skip and a jump away after the grueling two-month climb and acclimation to 26,000 feet. Standing there at Lhotse and peering up to the top of the world, one knows that it will be an epic struggle with every breath and step in the “death zone.”  And yet beholding the sights from that exposed face, and realizing how far you have come must be incredibly majestic and yet indescribable.  At the fleeting moment when all thoughts of fear and anticipation briefly subside, there must be an awe-inspiring sense of calm and spirituality. 

It is this sense of calm and peace within an environment of intense pressure that I sought to describe in this work. 

In his book “Into Thin Air,” Jon Krakauer describes moments perched on the Lhotse face; “I sat with my feet hanging over the abyss, staring across the clouds, looking down on the tops of 22,000- foot peaks that a month earlier had towered overhead.  At long last, it seemed as though I was really nearing the roof of the world.”